ODI Hidden Gems – Unique temporary object names


Hi all, I was not going to write about this one because I thought that this “hidden” gem was already known to every single ODI 12 developer out there, but I still get questions on why sometimes some specific data loads fails when they run in parallel, and they work fine when they run in serial. Most of the times, those are related to how ODI handles the temporary objects that it creates to do ETL (like C$, I$, E$ tables).

Let us see one example, which is the default in ODI. I have created one very simple mapping that has one source and one target table.

This mapping is loading data from two databases that resides in different data servers, so it will need to create a C$ table to be able to transfer the data. If we look at ODI Operator, we will notice the following:

The C$ table that it created is named as C$_0SECTIONTYPE. By default, ODI will create this name based on the source component that the data was generated from, so in this case it was a table called SECTIONTYPE. The “0” in front of it is an incremental number that would increase if you had another source with the same name in the mapping. For example, if you had SECTIONTYPE mapped twice as source tables, one would be loaded as C$_0SECTIONTYPE and the other C$_1SECTIONTYPE. ODI does that so we do not have a clash between names within the same ODI mapping.

However, what would happen if you tried to run the same mapping or another mapping that also contains SECTIONTYPE as source at the same time? As you may imagine, one mapping would interfere in the other, since both C$ tables would be called C$_0SECTIONTYPE and both mappings would be trying to load/read/drop it at the same time, which would cause a failure (in a good scenario) or wrong data (in a bad scenario).

To avoid this kind of issue to happen, ODI 10/11 developers were very creative in the past and would create some Java variables and some tweaks in some ODI KMs to make the temp table names dynamic. However, ODI 12 introduces something way simpler to handle this kind of situation, however, its not default and it is kind of “hidden”. If you go back to the mapping, click on the Physical tab, and scroll all the way down. You will notice a check box that says “Use Unique Temporary Object Names” that is unchecked. If you check this one and run it again, you will see the difference.

ODI now created a table named C$_0SECTIONTYPEAIHLNQMAVPK7Q1FR66UM225DF3, which is totally unique, and it will never clash with another mapping running in parallel. But then, another question arises: should I go to each mapping to check this option, if I want all to be unique? Well, the answer is no. There is another “hidden” gem that you can use.

Go to ODI Topology and double click your ODI agent, then go to Properties.

Luckily, you may enable the use of unique temporary objects at an ODI agent level, so you do not need to go back to each mapping and changing them.

That is it for today. See ya!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: