Archive for the EPM Category

ODI 12c Standalone Agent Install for an ODI 11g guy

Posted in InfraStructure, Install, ODI, ODI 11g, ODI 12c, ODI Architecture with tags , , , , , on July 17, 2017 by radk00

Hi everybody! Today’s post is about installing an ODI 12c standalone agent. This is not a “new” topic and the steps to perform it can also be found at the Oracle site, however it got me a little bit “off guard” when I was requested to install one and the reason is that it changed considerably comparing to ODI11g (and yeah, we still work A LOT with ODI11g, so installing ODI12c agent was “new” for us).

Prior to ODI 12 version, the ODI agent was configured by simply editing a file called odiparams.bat (odiparams.sh in Linux), which would contain all the necessary agent configuration parameters. It was a simple step, where you would enter the ODI master/work configuration, DB/ODI connection users and so on. After that, you would simply run the agent program and that was it, very short and easy to do. However, in ODI 12 version, it changed considerably and now we need to go through two wizard setups, one for creating the necessary pre-requisite DB schema for ”Common Infrastructure Services” and the other one to configure the ODI Standalone agent for us.

This change added some extra complexity to an architecture that was (talking exclusively about ODI Standalone Agent here) very simple to setup in the old days. Although Oracle provides wizards for us to minimize this effort, nothing was easier than simply configuring a parameter file and running a java program. But enough grumbling, let’s see how we may accomplish this task on ODI 12.

The first wizard that we need to run is the Repository Creation Utility (RCU) that is located here at ORACLE_HOME/oracle_common/bin/rcu.bat. Before we run it, we must understand what RCU is and what it can do for us. As its name suggests, it is a utility that may be used to create any repository component required for Oracle Fusion Middleware products, including the ODI Master/Work repository.

In our project, we did not create ODI Master/Work repository with RCU, but instead we got two empty Oracle DB schemas and installed ODI directly there. The reason why we did not use RCU in this situation is because RCU will force you to create one single Oracle DB schema that will store both ODI Master and Work repositories and this is not a good approach when dealing with large environments. We think that Oracle’s rational on this subject was to simplify certain ODI installs by unifying all in a single place, but again, this removes some of the ODI’s architecture flexibility and complicates the use of complex architectures in the future, like using multiple Work repositories attached to one Master.

So, if we already have ODI Master/Work repositories created, why do we still need RCU? This is because, from ODI 12 version on, we need a third Oracle DB schema that will be used to store the “Common Infrastructure Services” tables that are required for the ODI Standalone agent and the only way to create these tables are using the RCU utility.

Now that we have set our expectations around RCU, let’s run it. The first screen is just a welcome screen explaining what RCU is about, so just click Next.

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Now let’s select “Create Repository” and “System Load and Product Load”. Just notice that you will be asked for a DBA user in the next steps, since this DBA user will be used to create the necessary database objects (including the DB schema itself) in the new “Common Infrastructure Services” schema. Click Next.

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Add the database and DBA information and click next.

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ODI installer will check your information and if everything is ok, all tasks will be green. Select Ok to proceed.

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In the next screen is where we may select which components we want RCU to install. We may notice that RCU is able to create several schemas for different components, from ODI to WebLogic. Since we already have our Master and Work repositories created, we just need to select “AS Common Schemas”/”Common Infrastructure Services”. Note here that, for this schema, RCU will create it using what is added in the “Create new prefix” option plus a “_STB” postfix. Click Next.

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The installer will check the pre-requisites to install and if it is ok, a green check will appear. Click OK.

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In the next screen you will identify which schema password will be used on the new created DB schema. Add a password and click next.

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Define the Default and Temp table spaces that will be used by the new schema and click Next.

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If the table spaces does not exist, they will be created for you. Click Ok.

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The installer will check once more if everything is okay and also create the necessary table spaces. Click Ok.

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On the next page, we are going to have a Summary on what the installer will do. If everything looks correct, click Create to create the necessary DB objects.

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Check the Completion Summary, click close and that’s it! You have successfully created the “Common Infrastructure Services” schema, which is a pre-requisite for the ODI Agent install.

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The next step is to run the wizard setup that will configure the ODI Standalone agent for us. Run the Config program on ORACLE_HOME/oracle_common/common/bin/config.cmd. In the first screen let’s create a new domain. In this domain folder is where the ODI Agent batch programs will reside, such as Start/Stop agent. Select a meaningful folder and click next.

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In the next screen you will select “Oracle Data Integrator – Standalone Agent – 12.2.1.2.6 [odi]” and click next. This step will also install some basic Standalone components required for the ODI Agent.

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Select a valid JDK location and click next.

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Since we did not create our Master and Work repositories using RCU, we won’t be able to use the “RCU Data” option for Auto Configuration here. It is not a big deal, since we may select “Manual Configuration” and click next.

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Here we will need to input all the information related to two schemas: The ODI Master and the “Common Infrastructure Services“. The way that this screen works is tricky and confusing, since there are options that may be typed for all schemas at once. The best way to do it without any mistake is by selecting one of them, add all information, then uncheck and check the other one and add all the information again. Click next.

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The installer will check the information that was added here and if it is okay, two green marks will be showed in the Status column. Click next.

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The next screen will be used to define our ODI Agent name. Create a meaningful name here, since this will be used by the ODI users to select on which ODI agent they will run their ETL processes. Click next.

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Add the server address, the port and an ODI user/password that has “Supervisor” access. On preferred Data source option, leave it as odiMasterRepository and click next.

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Although we are not going to use our ODI Standalone Agent in a Node Manager object, which would be controlled by WebLogic, we still need to select a type for it and create a new credential. Add any name and a password for it (don’t worry, you will not use it for the ODI Standalone Agent) and click next.

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Review the install summary and if everything is ok, just click Create.

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Check all the steps as they turn into green checks and once completed, click next.

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That’s the end of the configurations! You have successfully completed the ODI Standalone agent configuration and it is ready to run.

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In order to run the ODI agent, open a CMD command, navigate to your base domain folder and run the ODI Agent start program with its name as an input argument: agent.cmd –NAME=DEV_AGENT. Wait a little bit for it to load and when its status gets to “started” it is good to go.

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Now that the ODI agent is up and running, we may go to ODI Topology/Agent and double click the ODI agent that you have created. Now we may click on the Test button and see what happens. If everything is correct, you will see an information windows saying that the ODI agent Test was Successful!

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Congratulations, now you have an ODI12c Standalone Agent configured. As you can see, we now have some more extra steps to do compared to ODI11g. I hope this post helps you to get prepared for this new kind of installs.

Thanks, see ya!

 

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ODICS is here!!!

Posted in New Features, ODI, ODI Architecture, ODICS with tags , , on February 13, 2017 by radk00

Hi all, quick but interesting post today! Oracle has just announced its Oracle Data Integrator Cloud Service (ODICS)! You may read about it here and here. We do not have much information about it yet (if it is a complete ODI solution, how it works, if it is similar to what we did in our ODI Cloud article), but we are hoping to get those answers in “Oracle Data Integration PM Webcast – Introducing Oracle Data Integrator Cloud Service (ODICS)” that will happen on Thursday, February 16, 2017 | 11:00 am Eastern Standard Time (GMT-05:00). We encourage all of you to join the webcast and have a first look on what ODICS looks like.

——- EDIT on Feb 23 ——-

Hi all, we’ve watched the ODICS webinar and in the end we were right: ODICS is very similar to what we did on our ODI Cloud article. The only difference is that ODICS is installed directly in JCS instead of a DBCS machine as we did in the article.

In resume, ODICS is nothing more, nothing less than the current ODI 12c installed in a JCS machine that is maintained by Oracle. There is only one restriction (that may not be a big issue for some projects), that the ODI agent needs to be running in the cloud, so you may not deploy it on premise. You may watch Oracle’s ODICS webinar here. You may also know more about ODICS at Christophe blog post.

 

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That’s it folks, exciting times are ahead of us!

OTN Article: Building a 100% Cloud Solution with Oracle Data Integrator

Posted in ACE, ArchBeat, BICS, DBCS, DEVEPM, EPM, EPM Automate, InfraStructure, ODI, ODI 11g, ODI Architecture, Oracle, Oracle Database, OS Command, OTN, PBCS, Tips and Tricks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 23, 2017 by RZGiampaoli

Hi guys how are you? Today I want to share our new OTN article Building a 100% Cloud Solution with Oracle Data Integrator.
The article will cover how to integrate BICS, PBCS, DBCS and ODI and will explain step by step how to create a 100% cloud solution using ODI (everything on the cloud including ODI :)).

This is a perfect article for companies that are thinking to go cloud and have some doubts or even are thinking how you can integrate/use your actual infrastructure with the cloud services.

I hope you guys enjoy and see you soon.

DEVEPM will be at KScope 17!!!

Posted in ACE, EPM, Kscope 17, ODI, ODTUG on January 9, 2017 by radk00

Hi all, how are you doing? With a little delay (sorry, I was on vacation 🙂 ) we are very happy to announce that DEVEPM will be once again at KScope! We are very honored to be selected to present on the best EPM conference in the word! Here is what we are going present at Kscope 17:

Data Warehouse 2.0: Master techniques for EPM guys (powered by ODI)

“EPM environments are generally supported by a Data Warehouse, however, we often see that those DWs are not optimized for the EPM tools. During the years, we have witnessed that modeling a DW thinking about the EPM tools may greatly increase the overall architecture performance.

The most common situation found in several projects is that the people that develops the data warehouse does not have a great knowledge about EPM tools and vice-versa. This may create a big gap between those two concepts which may severally impact performance.

This session will show a lot of techniques to model the right Data Warehouse for EPM tools. We will discuss how to improve performance using partitioned tables, create hierarchical queries with “Connect by Prior”, the correct way to use Multi-Period tables for block data load using Pivot/Unpivot and more. And if you want to go ever further, we will show you how to leverage all those techniques using ODI, which will create the perfect mix to perform any process between your DW and EPM environments.”

Kscope is the largest EPM conference in the world and it will be held on San Antonio, Texas on June 2017. It will feature more than 300 technical sessions, five symposiums, deep dive sessions, and hands on labs over the course of five days.

Got interested? If you register by March 25th you’ll take advantage of the Kscope early bird rates, then don’t waste more time and let’s be part of the greatest EPM event in the world. If you are still unsure about it, read our post about how Kscope/ODTUG changed our lives! Kscope is indeed a life changer event!

kscope17logo-pngmThank you very much everybody and we’ll be waiting for you at Kscope 17!

ODI 12c new features: Dimension and Cubes! Part 2 (Loading using Natural Keys)

Posted in Cubes, Dimensions, ETL, New Features, ODI 12c, ODI Architecture with tags , , , , , on September 14, 2016 by radk00

Hi all, let’s continue with our posts regarding “ODI 12c new features: Dimension and Cubes”. As stated in the previous post, we can have two ways to build our new objects: with natural keys or with surrogate keys. Today’s post will focus on loading the dimensions and fact tables that where created using natural keys (please see our previous post for all the settings required for those objects).

Let’s begin loading our TIME dimension (which was mapped to our TIME Oracle table). This dimension will have information from three different source tables: SRC_YEAR, SRC_QUARTER and SRC_MONTH. Each of them has information regarding each TIME hierarchy level, so all of them needs to be loaded in order to have a complete hierarchy in our final table.

The load process is very easy and intuitive: first create a new mapping and drag and drop the TIME dimension to it. Then, just add the three source tables, map to its correspondent level in the TIME dimension and that’s it. A very cool thing here is that ODI understands each level as a “separate” table/process, so you don’t need to join your source tables before actually loading it to the target dimension. In other words, ODI allows you to have any kind of complex ETL to each dimension level and each level will be treated as “separate” data loads that will be glued together by the hierarchy setting that you mapped in the TIME dimension object. Here is what it looks like:

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When you execute the mapping we are going to see that the first “MAP_BEGIN” section will try to create and truncate our stage tables that were set in our dimension object. Here is an odd thing (as we also mentioned in the last post): We could not understand yet why ODI “forces” you to have the stage tables created prior to execution (so you can select them in the Dimension object), as it could very well create them for you (like it does for C$ and I$ tables). I know that Oracle may had a reason behind it, but as for now, the entire “stage tables” thing seems an unnecessary setup. Anyway, the important thing here is that ODI will truncate the stage tables before any new execution.

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In the “MAP_MAIN” section is where it gets interesting. We can see here how ODI threats this new dimension object: each level has its own ETL, as we can see that it is loading YEAR, QUARTER and MONTH separately. First YEAR step will load its source to its stage table STG_YEAR, then QUARTER step will join the information from its source table plus STG_YEAR to its STG_QUARTER table. Finally, MONTH step, that is our leaf/grain level, will join its source table plus STG_QUARTER table (which is already joined with YEAR source) and merge it all together in our final table TIME. The result will look like below:

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Since we are not using Surrogate keys here, our Dimension table will contain only the grain/leaf members with all Natural Keys and its attributes for all levels that exists in the dimension. So one row will contain all information regarding all levels that it belongs to. When we create the mappings for the other two dimensions (they’re very similar, so I’m not adding them here) and execute them, we will get the following results:

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Let’s to go our Fact table load. This one is way too simple, since our source table already contains all the Natural Keys that will be the ones that will also exist in our FACT table (remember, we are not dealing with Surrogate Keys in this example). Here we just need to map each NK to its respective dimension column and also our Measure data and execute the mapping.

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When we take a look in Operator, we are going to see a single merge command in our Fact table, where ODI will use all dimensions to search if that row already exists in our FACT table. If it exists, the measure column is update, otherwise it is inserted.

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The final result is below: as expected, all Natural Keys from our dimensions were inserted in the Fact table, together with our measure.

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Now you may be wondering, why should I use these new features if it seems a lot of work (settings) for a little gain? Well, using ODI for Natural Key’s only is really not worth it, since the only benefit here seems to be ODI loading the dimensions levels all at once, with different sources/ETL, in a single mapping object, which is a very cool feature, since it enables us to better organize our DW objects and have a clear view on our ETL logic. But again, this is too little for the amount of work that we need to do to get there. But don’t worry, it will get way better when we start to work with Surrogate Keys, since ODI will be able to abstract all the Surrogate Key management and you will start to feel that all the necessary settings will finally be worth the work.

That’s it for today folks! We will be releasing the Surrogate Key settings and load posts very soon, so stay tuned in our blog! See ya!

PBCS, BICS, DBCS and ODI!!! Is that possible???

Posted in 11.1.1.9.0, 11.1.2.4, ACE, BICS, DBCS, EPM, EPM Automate, ODI, ODI 10g, ODI 11g, ODI 12c, ODI Architecture, ODI Architecture, Oracle, OS Command, PBCS, Performance, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on August 15, 2016 by RZGiampaoli

Hey guys, today I’ll talk a little bit about architecture, cloud architecture.

I just finished a very exciting project in Brazil and I would like to share how we put everything together for a 100% cloud solution that includes PBCS, BICS, DBCS and ODI. Yes ODI and still 100% cloud.

Now you would be thinking, how could be 100% cloud if ODI isn’t cloud yet? Well, it can be!

This client doesn’t have a big IT infrastructure, in fact, almost all client’ databases are supported and hosted by providers, but still, the client has the rights to have a good forecast and BI tool with a strong ETL process behind it right?

Thanks to the cloud solutions, we don’t need to worry about infrastructure anymore (or almost), the only problem is… ODI.

We still don’t have a KM for cloud services, or a cloud version of ODI, them basically we can’t use ODI to integrate could tools….

Or can we? Yes we can 🙂

The design is simple:

  1. PBCS: Basically we’ll work in the same way we would if it was just it.
  2. BICS: Same thing here, but instead of use the database that comes with BICS, we need to contract a DBCS as well and point the DW schema to it.
  3. DBCS: here’s the trick. Oracle’s DBCS is not else then a Linux machine hosted in a server. That means, we can install other things in the server, other things like ODI and VPN’s.
  4. ODI: we just need to install it in the same way we would do in an on premise environment, including the agent.
  5. VPN’s: the final touch, we just need to create VPN’s between the DBCS and the client DB’s, this way ODI will have access to everything it needs.

Yes you read it right, we can install ODI in the DBCS, and that makes ODI a “cloud” solution.

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The solution looks like this:

BICS: It’ll read directly from his DW schema in the DBCS.

PBCS: There’re no direct integration between the PBCS and DBCS (where the ODI Agent is installed), but I found it a lot better and easy to integrate them using EPM Automate.

EPM Automate: With EPM Automate we can do anything we want, extract data and metadata, load data and metadata, execute BR and more. For now the easiest way to go is create a script and call it from ODI, passing anything you need to it.

VPN’s: For each server we need to integrate we’ll need one VPN created. With the VPN between the DBCS and the hosts working, use ODI is extremely strait forward, we just need to create the topology as always, revert anything we need and work in the interfaces.

And that’s it. With this design you can have everything in the cloud and still have your ODI behind scenes! By the way, you can exactly the same thing with ODI on premise and as a bonus you can get rid of all VPN’s.

In another post I’ll give more detail about the integration between ODI and PBCS using EPM Automate, but I can say, it works extremely well and as far I know is a lot easier than FDMEE (at least for me).

Thanks guys and see you soon.

 

Kscope 16 has started…

Posted in ACE, EPM, Kscope 16, Oracle, OTN with tags on June 26, 2016 by RZGiampaoli

Greetings my fellow friends. As you know it’s that time of the year when we get together with our friends to have a lot of fun and decide what we will do next…. and it’s not Christmas but it is KSCOPE!!!
Yesterday we helped a little bit the Odtug guys and our friend Cameron to organize this amazing event 😉 (Very small help since we get there late :)).
And today we watch some cool news from Oracle and what is coming in the near future 🙂
Talking about Oracle, we just received our oracle Ace plaques 🙂

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Very nice 🙂 and I loved mine 🙂 match with my beard 🙂
Also, tomorrow, 27/Jun we will presenting two session. In the morning (10:15) we will talk about the Dell’s global EPM environment, you can expect to hear about all kind of solutions that we implemented over the Last 6 years, and I’m sure that you guys will get out of this session with a lot of ideas to implement. At afternoon (4:30) our session will be all about tips and tricks. You can expect to hear the best tricks we use in our development as well some ideas in how you can use them.
Come and join us in our presentations. We will be waiting for you guys.
And if we never match before, you just need to look for these badges 🙂

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Thank you and we are waiting for you tomorrow….