Archive for the ODI Architecture Category

Let’s Join DEVEPM @ KSCOPE 16

Posted in ACE, EPM, Essbase, ETL, Hyperion Essbase, Hyperion Planning, InfraStructure, Kscope 16, ODI, ODI 10g, ODI 11g, ODI 12c, ODI Architecture, ODTUG, Oracle Database, OS Command, Performance, Tips and Tricks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 5, 2016 by RZGiampaoli

Hi Guys how are you?

Just a quickly post about this year KSCOPE. This year we’ll have 2 excellent sessions:

Take a Peek at Dell’s Smart EPM Global Environment:

Ricardo Giampaoli , TeraCorp

Co-presenter(s): Rodrigo Radtke de Souza, Dell

When: Jun 27, 2016, Session 2, 10:15 am – 11:15 am

Topic: EPM Applications – Subtopic: Planning

In a fast-moving business environment, finance leaders are successfully leveraging technology advancements to transform their finance organizations and generate value for the business.
Oracle’s Enterprise Performance Management (EPM) applications are an integrated, modular suite that supports a broad range of strategic and financial performance management tools that help business to unlock their potential.

Dell’s global financial environment contains over 10,000 users around the world and relies on a range of EPM tools such as Hyperion Planning, Essbase, Smart View, DRM, and ODI to meet its needs.

This session shows the complexity of this environment, describing all relationships between those tools, the techniques used to maintain such a large environment in sync, and meeting the most varied needs from the different business and laws around the world to create a complete and powerful business decision engine that takes Dell to the next level. 

Incredible ODI Tips to Work with Hyperion Tools

Ricardo Giampaoli , TeraCorp

Co-presenter(s): Rodrigo Radtke de Souza, Dell

When: Jun 27, 2016, Session 6, 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

Topic: EPM Platform – Subtopic: EPM Data Integration

ODI is an incredible and flexible development tool that goes beyond simple data integration. But most of its development power comes from outside-the-box ideas.

  • Did you ever want to dynamically run any number of “OS” commands using a single ODI component?
  • Did you ever want to have only one data store and loop different sources without the need of different ODI contexts?
  • Did you ever want to have only one interface and loop any number of ODI objects with a lot of control?
  • Did you ever need to have a “third command tab” in your procedures or KMs to improve ODI powers?
  • Do you still use an old version of ODI and miss a way to know the values of the variables in a scenario execution?
  • Did you know ODI has four “substitution tags”? And do you know how useful they are?
  • Do you use “dynamic variables” and know how powerful they can be?
  • Do you know how to have control over you ODI priority jobs automatically (stop, start, and restart scenarios)?

If you want to know the answer to all this questions, please join us in this session to learn the special secrets of ODI that will take your development skills to the next level.

Join us in KSCOPE 16 and book our 2 sessions in schedule. They will be very good sessions and I’m sure that you’ll learn some new stuff that will help you in your EPM Environment!

SpeakerSquare (1)

Remotely Ziping files with ODI

Posted in 11.1.1.9.0, ACE, Configuration, EPM, Essbase, ETL, Hacking, Hyperion Essbase, InfraStructure, ODI, ODI 10g, ODI 11g, ODI 12c, ODI Architecture, ODI Architecture, OS Command, Performance, Remotely, Tips and Tricks, Zip Files with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 5, 2016 by RZGiampaoli

Hi guys how are you? It has been a long time since last time I wrote something but it was for a good reason! We were working in our two Kscope sessions! Yes, this year we will have 2 sessions and I think they will be great!

Anyway, let us get to the point!

Today I want to talk about something that should be very simple to do it but in the end, it is a nightmare…. Zip a file in a remote server…

A little bit of context! I was working in a backup interface for one client and, because their cubes are very big, I was trying to improve the performance as much as I can.

Part of the backup was to copy the .ind and .pag files and the data extract files as well. For an app we are talking in 30 gb of .pag and 40 gb of data extract files.

Their ODI infrastructure is like this:

Infrastructure

Basically I need to extract/copy data from Essbase server to the disaster recovery server (DR Server). Nothing special here. The problem is, because the size of the files I wanted to Zip the files first and then send it to the DR server.

If you use the ODI tools to Zip the file, what it does is bring all the files to the ODI Agent server, zip everything and the send it back. I really do not want all this traffic in the network and all the time lost in this process (also, the agent server is a LOT less powerful then the Essbase server).

Regular odi tools zip process

Then I start to research how I could do that (and thank you my colleague and friend Luis Fernando Cairo that help me a lot doing a lot of tests on this)

First of all we have three main options here:

  1. Create a .bat file and run it remotely: I did not like it because I do not want a lot of .bats all over the places
  2. Use windows invoke command: I need a program in the server like 7 zip or so and I don’t have access to install freely and I do not want to install zip’s program all over the places too
  3. Use Psexec to execute a program in the server: Same as the previous one.

Ok, I figure out that in the end I’ll need to create/install something in the server… and I rate it. Well, let’s at least optimize the problem right!

Then I was thinking, what I have in common in all Hyperion servers? The answer is JAVA.

Then I thought, I can use the JAR command to zip a file:

jar cfM file.zip *.pag *.ind

Where:

c: Creates a new archive file named jarfile (if f is specified) or to standard output (if f and jarfile are omitted). Add to it the files and directories specified by inputfiles.

f: Specifies the file jarfile to be created (c), updated (u), extracted (x), indexed (i), or viewed (t). The -f option and filename jarfile are a pair — if present, they must both appear. Omitting f and jarfile accepts a “jar file” from standard input (for x and t) or sends the “jar file” to standard output (for c and u).

M: Do not create a manifest file entry (for c and u), or delete a manifest file entry if one exists (for u).

Humm, things start to looks better. Now I had to decide if I would use the Invoke command or Psexec.

I started trying the Invoke command, but after sometime I figure out that I can’t execute the jar command using invoke.

Then my last alternative was Psexec.

The good thing about it is that is a zip file that you need just to unzip in the agent server, set it in the Environment Variables (PATH) and you are good to go.

It works amazingly.

You can run anything remotely with this and it’s a centralized solution and non-invasive as well (what I liked).

You just need to:

psexec \\Server  -accepteula  -w “work dir” javapath\jar cfM file.zip *.pag *.ind

Where:

-w: Set the working directory of the process (relative to remote computer).

-accepteula: This flag suppresses the display of the license dialog.

There’s one catch, for some unknown reason, the ODI agent does not get the PATH correctly then you need to use the complete path where it was “Installed”. The ODI is like this:

OdiOSCommand “-OUT_FILE=Log_Path/Zip_App_Files-RUM-PNL.Log” “-ERR_FILE =Log_Path /Zip_App_Files-RUM-PNL.err”

D:\Oracle\PSTools\psexec \\server -accepteula -w \\arborpath\APP\RUM\PNL\ JAVA_PATH\jdk160_35\bin\jar cfM App_Files-RUM-PNL.zip *.pag *.ind

With this, we will have a process like this:

Remotly Zip Process

This should not be something that complicate but it is and believe me, I create a very fast process and the client is very happy.

I hope you guys enjoy it and see you soon.

DEVEPM in “I want my ODI” OTN Podcast!!!

Posted in ACE, ArchBeat, EPM, ODI, ODI 12c, ODI Architecture, ODI Architecture, OTN, PodCast on January 15, 2016 by RZGiampaoli

Hi guys how are you doing? It’s a pleasure to announce that DEVEPM was invited by our friend Oracle ACE Michael Rayne to be part of “I want my ODI” OTN podcast.

You can expect forty minutes of a open conversation between integration experts talking about the new features and the future of ODI.

Please stay a while and listen 🙂

“I Want my ODI”

Starring:otn archbeat podcast

  • Oracle ACE Director Stewart Bryson
  • Jerome Francoisse
  • Oracle ACE Associate Rodrigo Radtke de Souza
  • Holger Freidrich
  • Oracle ACE Ricardo Giampaoli
  • Oracle ACE Michael Rainey

What happens when you gather a group of business intelligence experts who are passionate about Oracle Data Integrator? You’re about to find out.

This OTN ArchBeat podcast series was suggested by Oracle ACE Michael Rainey, who took on the guest producer and guest host roles for this program, selecting the topic and the panel.

As you’ll hear, the result is a wide-ranging, free-wheeling discussion of all things ODI. Take a listen!

Thanks guys and see you soon.

 

 

Tips and Tricks: Working with ODI Variables and Global Parameters

Posted in ODI Architecture with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 7, 2015 by RZGiampaoli

Hi guys, today we’ll talk about some very simple but powerful technic that we always use in our integrations. Its joins two concepts together and make our lives a lot easier and our integration a lot more dynamic. We are talking about variables and the concept of “Global” parameters.

In our integrations we never, ever have anything hard coded. Every time you hard code something it will come back to bite you in the future that is for sure.

Then the first thing we do in a project is to create a table that we call ODI_PARAMETER. This table will contain all configuration and parameters that needs to be validated, hard coded and so one.

I like to create this table in our work schema (to make easier to use) and its look like this:

ODI_PARAMETER Table

The “SESSION_NM” is used to make the variable reusable in all scenarios that we want, meaning we’ll have only one variable for packages in the project or even for all projects (if we make this variable global in ODI).

How it works? First of all we need to get the “Session Name” for our “Scenario/Package”. Why did I say “Scenario/Package”? Because the result could change depending if you are running a Scenario or a Package. Let me explain this.

To get the “Session Name” in ODI we use an ODI Substitution method called “odiRef.getSession”. This method has other parameter that could return the Session ID, and other stuff but what matters for us is the “SESS_NAME” parameter, that will return the name of the session, the same thing that appears in the operator when we run any object in ODI.

Why I said object? Because if you run a variable the session name will be the variable name. If you run an interface, the session name will be the interface name, it goes to procedure, package and scenario, and that is why I separate the “Scenario/Package” because if we do not pay attention, the name of the package would be different of the name of the scenario, causing a problem when we run one of them.

Let me show how it works. First of all, we’ll create a Global ODI variable called SESSION_NM (could be whatever you want, I just like to call it like this) and we’ll put this code inside of it:

SESSION_NM Variable

After that, we will run this variable to see the results:

SESSION_NM Results

As we can see, the value of the variable was the name of the Variable itself. Now, let us create a package, put this variable inside it, and see what’s happens:

Package test 1

Here is what the interface looks like and above its results:

Package test 1 results

As we can see the result of the variable is the same as the session but in UPPER case since I create the variable like this. But why I did that? Let me create a scenario of this package to show you why:

Scenario Creation

And this is why I create in the variable getting the result and put in UPPER and why I said we need to worry about some peculiarity regarding Scenarios and Packages. When you create a scenario will have the name of the interface in UPPER case and also, NO SPACES. Now, if we run the just created scenario we will have:

Scenario results

Meaning, if we will use the result of this variable as a way to return data from a table, we’ll have a problem because it’ll not find the same result if you run the package or the scenario of that package.

The easiest way to resolve that is to have the name of the main scenario (the scenario that will contain all the other scenarios) with no spaces and no special characters (ODI also transform special characters like % in to _).

Doing that and we are good to continue as we can see below:

Package results

Now we have the same results if we run the package or the scenario.

Ok next let us create another variable to return the LOG_PATH, the path where we will store all our logs from our integrations. The code that we will use for this variable is:

Query ODI_PARAMETER

As we can see we are using the result of the “SESSION_NM” variable in this “LOG_PATH” variable. This is what’ll make this variable reusable in all “Packages/Scenarios/Procedures”. Let us insert a value inside our ODI_PARAMETER Table and run the Package to see the results:

Insert Test 1

Package 1 Results

Now let us create a new package with a different name, use the same variable as above, and insert a new line in our ODI_PARAMETER table for the new interface:

Package 2 results

See, same code, two different results. That means, 90% of the interfaces needs just to be duplicated and the parameters in ODI_PARAMETER needs to be inserted for the new interface and it is done. Also, we don’t need a ton of variables to get different results. And there is more.

The code of the variable also does not change that much. For a new variable, we just need to duplicate the LOG_PATH variable and change the PARAMETER_TYPE, PARAMETER_NAME and PARAMETER_VALUE to get any other information from the ODI_PARAMETER. That means, easier to maintain.

However, let us not stop here. In this example, we are getting the LOG_PATH for our logs in our integrations. Normally this path does not change from integration to integration. What changes is the name of the integration that we are logging right? In addition, with our SESSION_NM variable we could just put in our LOG_PATH variable the root of our LOG folder and then use like this:

#LOG_PATH\#SESSION_NM

This would make the LOG_PATH equal for all integration right. Nevertheless, in the way we create our variables we will need to insert one line for each integration in our ODI_PARAMETER table right.

Well, we just need to change a little bit our code in our variable to create the concept of GLOBAL parameters. How it will work:

First, we will delete the two lines we just created and then we will insert just one line in ODI_PARAMETER table:

Insert Global

Now we just need to change the code from our LOG_PATH variable to this:

Query ODI_PARAMETER global

And here we go:

Global results

We have one global parameter that can be used for all integrations. And the cool thing is that the code above tests if we have a parameter for the actual SESSION_NM and if not it’ll get the parameter from the GLOBAL parameter, meaning if any integration needs a special LOG_PATH or something you just need to insert a new line in the ODI_PARAMETER to get the value just for that integration:

Global results exceptions

This will guarantee that you never ever needs to touch your code again to test or change anything that the business ask you for.

As I said, is a simple but very powerful tool to use.

Hope you guys enjoy and see you soon.

Stopping ODI sessions in an automated way

Posted in Hacking, ODI, ODI 11g, ODI Architecture with tags , , , on September 4, 2015 by radk00

Hi all! In today’s post we will talk about how you may create automatic processes to stop ODI sessions. But first let’s think why/when we should automate this kind of task.

Everybody knows that the basic way to stop an ODI session would be to go to ODI Operator, right click in a running Session and select “Stop Normal”/”Stop Immediate”. Obviously it works just fine, but it requires someone to log in, select the jobs and stop them. There will be cases that you will want to stop those scenarios without any human intervention.

So let’s imagine that you have a critical ODI job that must make sure that some other secondary ODI jobs are not running before it actually starts. Maybe you could add an OdiSleep object in the critical ODI job, wait a little bit, check if the secondary jobs are still running, sleep again and so on. It is safe approach, but sometimes this critical ODI job is also top priority and it could have permission to stop all other secondary ODI jobs before it actually starts.

Or maybe you could have an execution window that must be respected and all ODI jobs that crosses a specific range of time should be stopped no matter what. I could write some other examples, but you already got the idea. So, how do we accomplish that in ODI?

If we take a look on ODI Toolbox panel, we are going to find things like OdiStartScen and OdiStartLoadPlan, but nothing related to stop, cancel or kill a session.

Toolbox

I’m not sure why Oracle didn’t put this kind of objects in the Toolbox, but if we go to the ODI agent bin folder (oracledi\agent\bin) we are going to see some interesting .bat (.sh on linux) jobs there:

  • Restartloadplan.bat
  • Restartsession.bat
  • Startloadplan.bat
  • Startscen.bat
  • Stoploadplan.bat
  • Stopsession.bat

We may right click/edit each of those to get more information about them. Today we are interested in the last one “Stopsession.bat”. Its syntax is pretty simple:

stopsession <session_number> “-AGENT_URL=<agent_url>” [“-STOP_LEVEL=<normal(default)|immediate>”]

Pretty cool and easy to use. We may just add this call to an ODI procedure and create some logic to stop all sessions that we want. Let’s build an example and see how it would look like. Imagine that you have an ODI_JOB_A that needs to stop ODI_JOB_B and all its children (if there is any of those running) before it continues its tasks. To accomplish that, we would need to create an ODI procedure and use the command on source/target technique to select ODI_JOB_B and its children that are currently running. It would look like this:

Command on Source

On “Command on Source” we would write a SQL against the ODI metadata repository checking for all ODI_JOB_B sessions (and its children) that are currently running. Of course that this SQL is just an example, you may tweak it to fit your own requirements. Here we are just querying the SESS_NO that belongs to a running session of ODI_JOB_B and UNION that to all running children of a running ODI_JOB_B session.

On “Command on Target” it should be just a matter to add the stopsession cmd on “Operating System” technology, but it is not that easy. Let’s analyze the stopsession cmd again:

stopsession <session_number> “-AGENT_URL=<agent_url>” [“-STOP_LEVEL=<normal(default)|immediate>”]

session_number is a value that will return from our “Command on Source” tab, so we are good.

stop_level may be set as normal or immediate, so we are also good here.

The problem that we have is the AGENT_URL. A valid AGENT_URL would look like this:
-AGENT_URL=http://ODISERVER:9001/oraclediagent
This URL is composed with the information that is set in our Topology information, like the one below:

Agent

The problem here is that we don’t have any ODI substitution API that return this kind of information. The closest that we have is <%=odiRef.getSession(“AGENT_NAME”)%> that just returns its name, nothing more. To get around this situation, we will need to query ODI metadata repository again and compose this URL using a SQL against SNP_AGENT table. Let’s create one ODI variable for that like the one below:

Variable

Here we using the AGENT_NAME API function to get the right information for the running agent. Now we are able to finish our procedure with the “Command on Target” command:

Command on Target

And that’s it! Just add the AGENT_URL refresh variable and this procedure in the very beginning of ODI_JOB_A package and you will have it stop session ODI_JOB_B and its children before it moves on.

Hope you liked it! See you soon!

Do you know about ODI project on java.net?

Posted in EPM, ODI, ODI 12c, ODI Architecture with tags , , , on January 8, 2015 by radk00

Hi all, today’s post is just a quick tip about ODI project on java.net. I’m often asked if I know a place where there could be different KMs for ODI besides the ones that comes within its installation folder. Every time that I mention the ODI project on java.net, people reaction is always the same “Wow, that’s very nice! I didn’t know that!”.

ODI project on java.net is a collaboration site that contains a lot of code samples made for ODI. It contains Docs, KMs, Open Tools, Procedures, Samples, User Functions, Utilities and so on. Also if you have something that you think that would be useful for the others, you may collaborate with the community by adding your code there. Here is the link:

https://java.net/projects/oracledi

You just need to create an account and you are good to go! Enjoy!

Follow us on Twitter: @RodrigoRadtke @RZGiampaoli @DEVEPM