ODTUG Leadership Program 2018!!

Posted in ACE, DEVEPM, Kscope, Leadership Program, ODTUG, Uncategorized with tags , , , on September 1, 2017 by RZGiampaoli

Hi guys how are you?

ODTUG is opening the application for the 2018 leadership program. For those that don’t know what it is, it is a eight-month program (remote sessions) to help people to advance into leadership positions along their career track, improve their effectiveness in their current position or switch careers.

Rodrigo and I are past participants and we definitely advise anyone that wants to get involved and learn in the process to participate in this wonderful program.

To learn more about the program or give it a try you can click Here.

Hope you guys enjoy it.

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Automating Essbase Copy Outline Operation using Java API

Posted in ACE, BSO, Cubes, Essbase, Hacking, Hyperion Essbase, Java, Migration, Oracle with tags , , , , , , on August 9, 2017 by RZGiampaoli

Hi guys how are you? Did you guys ever tried to automate the process of coping a cube outline from one application to another?

Well, there’s an easy way to do that. Basically you copy the .otl from the server file system over the other cube. The problem is that if the cube is not empty, the database becomes corrupted since we just replaced an .otl file for another strange .otl file (no restructure happened).

Then if you want to copy the outline to an existing cube (that has data) this is not a solution.

The thing is, the only two possible ways to do what we want is the EAS “Save as” operation and the migration wizard. These both operations work because they copy the .otl file as .otn and then run a restructure in the database. The restructure “synchronize” the cube with the new outline, making the process safe for a cube that has data on it.

The problem is, none of these can be automated and there’re no way to do this operation using Maxl or EssCmd.

In fact, even using the Java API, it’s hard to figure out how to do that because all the copy methods seem to copy all kind of objects but the outline.

The good news is, we figured out a way to replicate the “Save as” operation using the Java API after hours of frustration and tears…

Here we go:

Save As Java code

The code is really simple. We need to connect in the essbase server, lock the target outline (the one we’ll overwrite) and then copy the outline from one application to another. To do that we are going to use the functions “lockOlapFileObject” and “copyOlapFileObjectToServer”.

This process that we just described will create an .otn file in the target cube. Now comes the great catch of this code (that is not documented anywhere):

If we open the target outline in EAS we will still see the old metadata. To commit the changes, we need to perform a restructure to merge the new outline (.otn) with the old one (.otl) updating the metadata.

To do that we are going to use the functions in the class “IEssCubeOutline” to “open”, “restructureCube” and “close” the target outline.

That is it. This process will do exactly what the “Save As” in EAS does, which means that you can copy outlines from one application to another even when the target database contains data.

I hope you guys enjoy and see you soon.

Loading and Extracting HFM 11.1.2.4 Data with ODI Knowledge Modules (ODTUG Article)

Posted in 11.1.2.4, HFM, Knowledge Models, ODI 11g, Technical Journal with tags , , , on August 8, 2017 by radk00

Hi all!

ODTUG just released our article about “Loading and Extracting HFM 11.1.2.4 Data with ODI Knowledge Modules“. This second article shows all the details behind the construction of ODI IKM for data load and also a procedure to extract data from HFM 11.1.2.4 and it also explain all its options and functionalities.

Please feel free to download and use our KMs. They do not have official Oracle Support, but we try our best to answer and fix any issues that you may find (don’t forget to take a look on our “debug” post here).

Thanks everyone!

ODI 12c Standalone Agent Install for an ODI 11g guy

Posted in InfraStructure, Install, ODI, ODI 11g, ODI 12c, ODI Architecture with tags , , , , , on July 17, 2017 by radk00

Hi everybody! Today’s post is about installing an ODI 12c standalone agent. This is not a “new” topic and the steps to perform it can also be found at the Oracle site, however it got me a little bit “off guard” when I was requested to install one and the reason is that it changed considerably comparing to ODI11g (and yeah, we still work A LOT with ODI11g, so installing ODI12c agent was “new” for us).

Prior to ODI 12 version, the ODI agent was configured by simply editing a file called odiparams.bat (odiparams.sh in Linux), which would contain all the necessary agent configuration parameters. It was a simple step, where you would enter the ODI master/work configuration, DB/ODI connection users and so on. After that, you would simply run the agent program and that was it, very short and easy to do. However, in ODI 12 version, it changed considerably and now we need to go through two wizard setups, one for creating the necessary pre-requisite DB schema for ”Common Infrastructure Services” and the other one to configure the ODI Standalone agent for us.

This change added some extra complexity to an architecture that was (talking exclusively about ODI Standalone Agent here) very simple to setup in the old days. Although Oracle provides wizards for us to minimize this effort, nothing was easier than simply configuring a parameter file and running a java program. But enough grumbling, let’s see how we may accomplish this task on ODI 12.

The first wizard that we need to run is the Repository Creation Utility (RCU) that is located here at ORACLE_HOME/oracle_common/bin/rcu.bat. Before we run it, we must understand what RCU is and what it can do for us. As its name suggests, it is a utility that may be used to create any repository component required for Oracle Fusion Middleware products, including the ODI Master/Work repository.

In our project, we did not create ODI Master/Work repository with RCU, but instead we got two empty Oracle DB schemas and installed ODI directly there. The reason why we did not use RCU in this situation is because RCU will force you to create one single Oracle DB schema that will store both ODI Master and Work repositories and this is not a good approach when dealing with large environments. We think that Oracle’s rational on this subject was to simplify certain ODI installs by unifying all in a single place, but again, this removes some of the ODI’s architecture flexibility and complicates the use of complex architectures in the future, like using multiple Work repositories attached to one Master.

So, if we already have ODI Master/Work repositories created, why do we still need RCU? This is because, from ODI 12 version on, we need a third Oracle DB schema that will be used to store the “Common Infrastructure Services” tables that are required for the ODI Standalone agent and the only way to create these tables are using the RCU utility.

Now that we have set our expectations around RCU, let’s run it. The first screen is just a welcome screen explaining what RCU is about, so just click Next.

1

Now let’s select “Create Repository” and “System Load and Product Load”. Just notice that you will be asked for a DBA user in the next steps, since this DBA user will be used to create the necessary database objects (including the DB schema itself) in the new “Common Infrastructure Services” schema. Click Next.

2

Add the database and DBA information and click next.

3

ODI installer will check your information and if everything is ok, all tasks will be green. Select Ok to proceed.

4

In the next screen is where we may select which components we want RCU to install. We may notice that RCU is able to create several schemas for different components, from ODI to WebLogic. Since we already have our Master and Work repositories created, we just need to select “AS Common Schemas”/”Common Infrastructure Services”. Note here that, for this schema, RCU will create it using what is added in the “Create new prefix” option plus a “_STB” postfix. Click Next.

5

The installer will check the pre-requisites to install and if it is ok, a green check will appear. Click OK.

6

In the next screen you will identify which schema password will be used on the new created DB schema. Add a password and click next.

7

Define the Default and Temp table spaces that will be used by the new schema and click Next.

8

If the table spaces does not exist, they will be created for you. Click Ok.

9

The installer will check once more if everything is okay and also create the necessary table spaces. Click Ok.

10

On the next page, we are going to have a Summary on what the installer will do. If everything looks correct, click Create to create the necessary DB objects.

11

Check the Completion Summary, click close and that’s it! You have successfully created the “Common Infrastructure Services” schema, which is a pre-requisite for the ODI Agent install.

12

The next step is to run the wizard setup that will configure the ODI Standalone agent for us. Run the Config program on ORACLE_HOME/oracle_common/common/bin/config.cmd. In the first screen let’s create a new domain. In this domain folder is where the ODI Agent batch programs will reside, such as Start/Stop agent. Select a meaningful folder and click next.

13

In the next screen you will select “Oracle Data Integrator – Standalone Agent – 12.2.1.2.6 [odi]” and click next. This step will also install some basic Standalone components required for the ODI Agent.

14

Select a valid JDK location and click next.

15

Since we did not create our Master and Work repositories using RCU, we won’t be able to use the “RCU Data” option for Auto Configuration here. It is not a big deal, since we may select “Manual Configuration” and click next.

16

Here we will need to input all the information related to two schemas: The ODI Master and the “Common Infrastructure Services“. The way that this screen works is tricky and confusing, since there are options that may be typed for all schemas at once. The best way to do it without any mistake is by selecting one of them, add all information, then uncheck and check the other one and add all the information again. Click next.

17

The installer will check the information that was added here and if it is okay, two green marks will be showed in the Status column. Click next.

18

The next screen will be used to define our ODI Agent name. Create a meaningful name here, since this will be used by the ODI users to select on which ODI agent they will run their ETL processes. Click next.

19

Add the server address, the port and an ODI user/password that has “Supervisor” access. On preferred Data source option, leave it as odiMasterRepository and click next.

20

Although we are not going to use our ODI Standalone Agent in a Node Manager object, which would be controlled by WebLogic, we still need to select a type for it and create a new credential. Add any name and a password for it (don’t worry, you will not use it for the ODI Standalone Agent) and click next.

21

Review the install summary and if everything is ok, just click Create.

22

Check all the steps as they turn into green checks and once completed, click next.

23

That’s the end of the configurations! You have successfully completed the ODI Standalone agent configuration and it is ready to run.

24

In order to run the ODI agent, open a CMD command, navigate to your base domain folder and run the ODI Agent start program with its name as an input argument: agent.cmd –NAME=DEV_AGENT. Wait a little bit for it to load and when its status gets to “started” it is good to go.

25

Now that the ODI agent is up and running, we may go to ODI Topology/Agent and double click the ODI agent that you have created. Now we may click on the Test button and see what happens. If everything is correct, you will see an information windows saying that the ODI agent Test was Successful!

26

Congratulations, now you have an ODI12c Standalone Agent configured. As you can see, we now have some more extra steps to do compared to ODI11g. I hope this post helps you to get prepared for this new kind of installs.

Thanks, see ya!

 

Are You an ODTUG Kscope Aficionado?

Posted in Kscope, Kscope 17, ODTUG, Uncategorized with tags , , , on June 13, 2017 by RZGiampaoli

Hi guys, today I have a very exiting opportunity for all kscope veterans that would like to help the newcomers.

The ODTUG K Team

If you are an ODTUG Kscope aficionado and think you can help guide the ODTUG Kscope newcomers down the right path? Join the K Team! K Team members are here to help newcomers take advantage of everything ODTUG has to offer. Interested in being involved? Sign up now and we’ll send you all the information you need.

Let’s help the newcomers to get the most of our beloved conference and of course have a lot of fun in the process 🙂

See you guys in a couple of weeks at Kscope 17!!!

Kscope 17 is approaching fast!!! And we’ll be there!

Posted in ACE, Data Warehouse, Essbase, Hyperion Essbase, Java, Kscope 17, ODI, ODI Architecture, Oracle, Performance, Tips and Tricks, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on June 8, 2017 by RZGiampaoli

Hi guys how are you? We are sorry for being away for so much time but this year we have a lot of exiting things going one, then let’s start with what we’ll be doing at Kscope 17!

This year we’ll present 2 sessions:

Essbase Statistics DW: How to Automatically Administrate Essbase Using ODI (Jun 28, 2017, Wednesday Session 12 , 9:45 am – 10:45 am)

In order to have a performatic Essbase cube, we must keep vigilance and follow up its growth and its data movements so we can distribute caches and adjust the database parameters accordingly. But this is a very difficult task to achieve, since Essbase statistics are not temporal and only tell you the cube statistics is in that specific time frame.

This session will present how ODI can be used to create a historical statistical DW containing Essbase cube’s information and how to identify trends and patterns, giving us the ability for programmatically tune our Essbase databases automatically.

And…

Data Warehouse 2.0: Master Techniques for EPM Guys (Powered by ODI)  (Jun 26, 2017, Monday Session 2 , 11:45 am – 12:45 pm)

EPM environments are generally supported by a Data Warehouse; however, we often see that those DWs are not optimized for the EPM tools. During the years, we have witnessed that modeling a DW thinking about the EPM tools may greatly increase the overall architecture performance.

The most common situation found in several projects is that the people who develop the data warehouse do not have a great knowledge about EPM tools and vice-versa. This may create a big gap between those two concepts which may severally impact performance.

This session will show a lot of techniques to model the right Data Warehouse for EPM tools. We will discuss how to improve performance using partitioned tables, create hierarchical queries with “Connect by Prior”, the correct way to use multi-period tables for block data load using Pivot/Unpivot and more. And if you want to go ever further, we will show you how to leverage all those techniques using ODI, which will create the perfect mix to perform any process between your DW and EPM environments.

These presentations you can expect a lot of technical content, some very good tips and some very good ideas to improve your EPM environment!

Also I’ll be graduating in this year leadership program and this year we’ll be all over the place with the K-Team, a special team created to make the newcomers fell more welcome and help them to get the most of the kscope.

Also Rodrigo will be at Tuesday Lunch and Learn for the EPM Data Integration track on Cibolo 2/3/4.

And of course we will be around having fun an gathering new ideas for the next year!!!

And the last but not least, this year we’ll have a friend of us making his first appearance at Kscope with the presentation OBIEE Going Global! Getting Ready for More Than +140k Users (Jun 26, 2017, Monday Session 4 , 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm).

A standard Oracle Business Intelligence (OBIEE) reporting application can hold more or less 1,200 users. This may be a reasonable number of users for the majority of the companies out there, but what happens when an IT leader like Dell decides to acquire another IT giant like EMC and all of their combined 140,000-plus users need to have access to an HR OBIEE instance? What does that setup looks like? What kind of architecture do we need to have to support those users in a fast and reliable way?
This session shows the complexity of Dell’s OBIEE environment, describing all processes and steps performed to create such environment, meeting the most varied needs from business demands and L2 support, always aiming to improve environment stability. This architecture relies on a range of different technologies to support that huge amount of end users such as LDAP & SSL, Kerberos, SSO, SSL, BigIP, Shared Folders using NAS, Weblogic running into a cluster within #4 application servers.
If the challenge was not hard enough already, all of this setup also needed to consider Dell’s legacy OBIEE upgrade from v11.1.1.6.9 to v11.1.1.7.160119, so we will explain what were the pain points, considerations and orchestration needed to do all of this in parallel.

Thank you guys and see you there!

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Integrating HFM 11.1.2.4 with ODI Metadata Knowledge Modules (OTN Article)

Posted in 11.1.2.4, HFM, Knowledge Models, ODI 11g on June 1, 2017 by radk00

Hi all!

It took a while but it is finally live! Oracle OTN released our article about “Integrating HFM 11.1.2.4 with ODI Metadata Knowledge Modules“. It shows all the details behind the construction of ODI RKM and Metadata IKM for HFM 11.1.2.4 and also explain all its options and functionalities.

Please feel free to download and use our KMs. They do not have official Oracle Support, but we try our best to answer and fix any issues that you may find (don’t forget to take a look on our “debug” post here).

Thanks everyone!